Nicks workshop mutterings

Various railway orientated modelling projects in my new workshop/railway room.

Archive for the category “scenery”

Eggesford report

As I progress to rework the scenery the original painted plaster is really looking tired. Recently I have been revamping the area around the station and river. 

Considering the buildings are over 25 years old they are in remarkable condition and have needed very little work other than a repaint from Southern to LSWR livery. I have now done all the paintwork around the station as well as freshening up the surface of the platform as well as the road. The platform surface, as described before, has been done with talc sprinkled into wet Humbrol no. 40 gloss grey. This is the method described by Gordon Gravett in his marvellous book on modelling grassland; a book I would thoroughly recommend. The road surface is a lighter grey with chinchilla dust added to the wet paint. It still needs further weathering with weathering powders.

Goods shed with signal box in background. The grass is a mixture of long and short static grass. The road surface is the original and will eventually need some re-working. 


The next photo shows the original scenery in the foreground with the hill in the rear re-worked with scatter materials and new  hedging. The trees come from the original layout but have been freshened up with a dusting of new fine Woodlands scenic scatter. The second half of the river is waiting for a new coat of varnish similar to the bit seen in the distance.


I am really pleased with how the scenery is improving with relatively very little effort mainly due to having such a good base to start with. I am now looking forward to adding more details and atmosphere to the scenes. 

Lakebank – update

As many will know, Lakebank was featured in the latest issue of Model Railway Journal, no. 250. Since it was published we have added more details to the scene. These include fencing along the edge of the lakeside, advertising around the station and steamer office and the appearance of the Swallow and the Amazon. 

These two dingies were made by making a balsa wood former for the hull and covering it in aluminium foil. Strips of cartridge paper were then glued with paper glue around the former, each one being overlapped to represent clinkers. When the whole had dried the former was removed. This was easy as the paper glue did not stick to the foil. The hull was then completed with seats etc using thin card. The mast is a thinned down cocktail stick and the sail is cut from paper and painted.  The details of the two dingies were found on a website devoted to all things ‘Ransome’. A Google search will find it. 


The next job will be to provide some more road vehicles and then to augment the freight wagon stock. 

Eggesford- more progress

The scenery that the late Jeremy Dixon had done on Eggesford was very solid when I took the layout over. The finish was mainly done by painting the scene and lacked much texture.  The pictures below show the state before I started;


I have added texture to the rough area on the left along the river bank with Woodland scenics coarse scatter and bushes and to the field on the right with various grades of static grass mixed in with fine turf scatter. I have improved the trees using a mixture of scatter from green scenes and Carrs. Finally the river has been given a new coating of varnish.  

Canal locks update

I have now finished the detailing of the two locks including the gates in various stages of delay.

Here are some pictures of the end result.

Firstly the upper lock with the tail bridge and cut out to accept the lock keepers cottage;


Secondly the lower lock with more derelict gates;


Now to find the time to deliver them to the museum!

Canal locks progress

I have now finished the main carcass for the upper of the two locks. This one includes a limestone tail bridge used for getting horses from one side of the canal to the other together with a cut out to take the lock keepers  cottage when it is  installed in it’s scenic tray. The bleached carpet felt grass has been applied and now awaits painting and then the fun bit of adding all the weeds, brambles, ivy etc can begin. 

  
The canal was abandoned in 1914 but most of the pictures we have of their derelict state were taken in the 1990s. At that time there was still some evidence of the lock gates. As they would only have been derelict for some 15 to 20 years at the period we are modelling one can surmise that there would be a bit more of the gates and other bits still in situ. The lower lock will have very derelict lower gates and the remnants of the upper gate while the upper lock being near the lock keepers cottage will have more intact gates. 

  

Canal locks for Pendon

One of the last projects commissioned by the late Roger Haywood, Pendon modelling coordinator, was for the Wilts and Berks disused canal locks for the Vale scene and I was asked to make them. 

The canal became abandoned in 1914 and by the time of the Pendon scene they had fallen into a state of decay.

  
Two locks are required, one of which has a bridge over the lower end which carries a track from the nearby farm to the lock keepers cottage. Because of the distance the canal has to fall in the scene it has become necessary for each lock to have a 11 feet drop.

I have started work on the lower lock. The brickwork is being done with Howard’s Scenics embossed brick card as most of the brickwork will be covered in ivy and brambles. I have glued the embossed sheet to a card base and after painting it with a mortar wash I painted the bricks by the method described in the instructions. A mixture of water colour to the correct brick colour is applied by stamping with the cut surface of an eraser coated in the paint. When dry weathering powders were applied.

  
Because the lock is so deep I decided to make up one side and the base first. I then glued and painted plumbers hemp bundles to the base before assembling the second side and the associated  egg boxing for the scene. 

   
 
Once the scrim and plaster has been added work can start on preparing the surface of the lock and adding all the weeds etc. This lock will have the remains of the lower gates and part of the upper gate. 

Cowleaze Farm progress 2

I have turned my attention to the front of the farm. There is a gravel area and a front fence with two gates leading onto the drive to the garage.

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The fencing is made from hoops of .41mm brass wire set into a strip of cardboard and then the horizontal wires are soldered on. The whole lot is then set into a slot in the ground plaster. This is an idea given to me by a fellow modeller Stuart Holt.

The gravel is represented by sprinkling chinchilla dust into wet masonry paint and when dry the worn paths were made by rubbing with a fibre glass pencil..

The gates are built up from evergreen plastic strip.

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The next step is to finish the stone walls around the orchard and install all the various gates.

Lakebank progress 2

Steady progress is being made on the layout despite lots of talking and coffee on club nights!

The scenery around the throat of the layout is almost complete and efforts are being made to get the layout running more smoothly and complete some of the stock.

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there will eventually be a back scene to replace the stark white board as at present.

50 challenge

I have decided to enter the 50 challenge to celebrate the 50th anniversary of tHe 3mm Society. This is in addition to continuing with Cowleaze Farm (see earlier posts), building extra rolling stock for Yeoton Wharf(see my other blog) and painting and lettering the stock for Lakebank(see earlier posts). Who ever said a male can’t multitask !

For the 50 challenge I have decided to make a small dockside shunting scene 50 cms wide and 50 cms deep. At the front will be a three masted schooner which I am recycling from a China clay wharf I built some time ago.
The layout has not got a name yet but it will be dependent on an experiment I am trying with the painting. More later………

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Cowleaze vegetable garden- finished

Well the growing season has been good and the garden is full of produce!

There are a lot of weeds growing around the garden. These are a mixture of static grass applied to thin amounts of PVA, plumbers hemp sprayed with varnish and then scatter added to represent nettle and some woodlands scenics dried grass strands dipped in PVA and then coloured and green scatter to represent rose bay willow herb.

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It is amazing how much mess is created when doing this type of scenic work as can be seen in this photo of my work bench. Loads of different containers of scatter material, card, glue, paint and books for inspiration!

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The next step will be to finish the stone walling around the orchard and front of the house and then move onto the detailing of the orchard.

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sed30's Blog

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